Patty pan summer squash with cous cous and camembert

Here is a really delicious comforting dish, If I am honest! First of all, I was wondering what to do with patty pan summer squash I bought from the farmers market and I decided to cook something similar to this recipe but this is totally my invention depending on what I found in the fridge and luckily worked out well! Although camembert is a heavy cheese, I think it gives a nice, creamy texture to squash!

A little note from Wikipedia, made me smile: The name “pattypan” derives from “a pan for baking a patty.” Its French name, “pâtisson,” derives from a Provençal word for a cake made in a scalloped mould.

What do I need to buy?

2 medium or big size patty pan summer squash
a glass of cous cous
left over half a pack of camembert (feta cheese or brie may be?)
two or three cloves of chrushed garlic
parmesan shavings
red pepper flakes or any spicy red pepper sauce
tomato or spicy pepper paste
dry mint (or fresh parsley)
olive oil

How to cook patty pan summer squash?

1. Put the squash into a pan full of water, bring it up to boil and keep until it is soft to let a fork go in.
2. Take them out, cut the tops with a knife and remove the seeds out.
3. Whilst the squash are cooling down, boil some water and pour it on cous cous (just over)
4. In another bowl, mix the camembert, red pepper flakes, one spoonful of tomato or red pepper paste, dry mint, crushed garlic and use a spoonful of watered yoghurt to mix them nicely.
5. Fill your squash with this stuffing then put some parmesan over. Grill them until the top part gets brownish.
6. Serve with some rocket salad and yoghurt!

Delicious!

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Spinach and Feta Borek – Filo Pastries

Yummy! I have never ever rejected anyone offering borek. If you want to find out why, try this recipe. It is perfect for picnics as it is edible hot or cold, any time of the day.

You can call anything cooked with filo pastries “borek” actually, but this dish is cooked happily in the Balkans as burek, in Greece as spanakopita (with spinach and feta), in Israel as burekas (with cheese).

You can fill your borek with anything you want, but usually cheese and spinach is used.  Flat parsley or minced meat are also good options.

Let’s begin:

  • 500g filo pastry
  • 1 glass of milk
  • 5 spoonfuls of olive oil or butter
  • 3 eggs
  • some sunflower seeds or black seeds
  • 250g feta cheese
  • 1 pack of fresh spinach leaves (alternatively a big bunch of parsley)

1. Spread some butter onto your cooking tray, this will stop your borek from sticking the tray.
2. Filo pastry is usually sold in a round shape so leave one sheet aside and cut the rest to fit to your tray.
3. Mix your butter or olive oil, milk, and eggs all together in a bowl.  Stir well.
4. Put the sheet of filo pastry in your tray, leave the corners out, you will close them at the top once you finish layering.
5. Spread the oil-milk-egg mixture with a brush over each sheet, and put each sheet on top of the other.  Use half of the sheets.
6. Soften the spinach in a pan quickly, cool it down and mix with crumbled feta cheese. (if you use parsely, you do not need to cook it.)
7. Pour this mixture onto your filo pastry layers in the tray.
8. Then, carry on putting the filo pastries one by one over this mixture and each time do not forget to spread some butter-milk-egg mixture onto the sheets otherwise they will become dry.
9. When there is no filo pastry left, cover the corners of the first big sheet onto your borek and spread the rest of the butter-milk-egg mixture on top.

10. Sprinkle some seeds over it.

11. Cook it for about 20 minutes in the middle of a pre-heated oven at 200C, until the top and the bottom gets brownish. It is delicious eaten with a spoonful of yoghurt.

Bon appetit!

Lentil Kofte

Hello,

Well, I cooked these lovely lentil koftes for the Greek Easter weekend we had with friends, mostly drinking and eating lovely food.

It is very easy and a good mezze to have next to meaty stuff as well as by itself. Me? I can eat it even first thing in the morning : )

Here are the ingredients:

  • 1 glass of red lentils
  • 1 glass of  bulgar wheat (fine bulgar – which you can find in  Turkish, Middle Eastern or even sometimes Polish shops)
  • 5-6 spring onions
  • 2 medium onions or 1 big one
  • Spicy tomato paste (or preferably hot pepper paste, but it is hard to find)
  • Hot pepper sauce, called Harissa, or just a red pepper
  • Lettuce (little gem is preferable)
  • A small bunch of parsley
  • Mint (or fresh dill is also nice)
  • Black pepper
  • Salt
  • Olive oil
  • Water – 3 or 4 glasses

1. Boil the red lentils with 3 or 4 glasses of water until they get very soft – almost melting.
2. Add a glass of fine bulgur wheat to the lentil mixture. This will make the mixture dry out a bit, so that it is firm but not sticky. Let it cool down until you can hold it in your hands. Taste it – if the bulgur wheat inside the mixture is not soft enough, add half or a glass of hot water to soak it up.
3. Chop the onions finely and cook them in olive oil then add the pepper paste and harissa or red pepper, mix it well.
4. Add the onion and pepper mixture over your already cooled down lentil & bulgur wheat and mix them well.
5. Add some salt, black pepper and mint.
6. Chop the spring onions and parsley and add them to this mixture, stir well. It should not be too dry not too wet, make some balls with it and put them over little gem lettuce on a plate.  Squeeze lemon on top.
7. Cool it down for an hour or so before you eat it!

Enjoy!

Tabbouleh – KISIR

bulgur wheat

“If you were leaving for a desert island which three mezes would you take along with you?” The reporter asks. Lebanese cook does not hesitate: “Tabbouleh, tabbouleh and tabbouleh.”

This was on BBC radio the other day while I was about to start making tabbouleh or Kısır as it is said in Turkish. And I do believe that it is one of the easiest and tastiest meze i ever had. Also very healthy as it is cooked with bulgar wheat.

It is one of the dishes my mom used to do for tea when her friends were coming over. In Lebanon, they like it is more like parsley salad. which I quite like as well. Ok, let’s begin then!

What do I need to buy?

  • 1 Cup Bulgur Wheat (fine grained you can find two types of bulgur wheat either fine or for rice)
  • 1/2 Cup olive oil
  • 1/2 Cup lemon juice
  • 2 – 3 tsbp of tomato and pepper paste
  • Salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 bunch flat parsley
  • 1 bunch mint
  • 5 -6 spring onions
  • 2-3 ripe tomatoes finely chopped (optionally peeled)
  • pomegranate sauce (optional and could be found in middle eastern shops)

How do I cook it then?

  1. Cover the wheat in boiling water and let stand for five minutes it will absorb all the water
  2. mix lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper then add half of it over the wheat.
  3. Chop the spring onions, parsley, mint, tomatoes and cucumber.
  4. Mix all the vegetables with bulgur wheat while stirring add the rest of the oil- lemon juice mixture.
  5. If you can find some pomegranate sauce this is the time to add it. It has a sour taste so It is important not to add a lot if you put lemon juice already.
  6. Refrigerate few hours but you can have it without refrigerating.
  7. Tabbouleh is ready, you can have it with some iceberg lettuce a well, enjoy!